Ú-reniathach i amar galen.
I reniad lín ne môr, nuithannen! In gwidh ristennin i fae narchannen.
I Lach Anor ed ardhon gwannen.Nauva I nauva.

 

(They have that mental speech in their minds)Frodo: *oooops*Galadriel: * Phew! you little sh*t*Frodo: *sorry my Lady there was no anti - dandruff shampoo*

(They have that mental speech in their minds)

Frodo: *oooops*
Galadriel: * Phew! you little sh*t*
Frodo: *sorry my Lady there was no anti - dandruff shampoo*

“Your time may come. Do not be too sad, Sam. You cannot be always torn in two. You will have to be one and whole, for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do.” 

(Source: glorfindhel)


Do not be afraid, Mithrandir. Y o u   a r e   n o t   a l o n e . If you ever need aid, I will come.

Do not be afraid, Mithrandir. Y o u   a r e   n o t   a l o n e . If you ever need aid, I will come.

(Source: thecrownlesskings)

markedasinfernal:

'But in that hour Finarfin forsook the march, and turned back, being filled with grief, and with bitterness against the House of Fëanor, because of his kinship with Olwë of Alqualondë; and many of his people went with him, retracing their steps in sorrow…' - Of the Flight of the Noldor, The Silmarillion.
The Boy Folded the World: Eternity, by goran-alena

markedasinfernal:

'But in that hour Finarfin forsook the march, and turned back, being filled with grief, and with bitterness against the House of Fëanor, because of his kinship with Olwë of Alqualondë; and many of his people went with him, retracing their steps in sorrow…' - Of the Flight of the Noldor, The Silmarillion.

The Boy Folded the World: Eternity, by goran-alena


… Galadriel, most beautiful of all the house of Finwë; her hair was lit with gold as though it had caught in a mesh the radiance of Laurelin.

… Galadriel, most beautiful of all the house of Finwë; her hair was lit with gold as though it had caught in a mesh the radiance of Laurelin.

markedasinfernal:

'But Finarfin spoke softly, as was his wont, and sought to calm the Noldor, persuading them to pause and ponder ere deeds were done that could not be undone: and Orodreth, alone of his sons, spoke in like manner.' - Of the Flight of the Noldor, The Silmarillion
Ataresto, by Filat

markedasinfernal:

'But Finarfin spoke softly, as was his wont, and sought to calm the Noldor, persuading them to pause and ponder ere deeds were done that could not be undone: and Orodreth, alone of his sons, spoke in like manner.' - Of the Flight of the Noldor, The Silmarillion

Ataresto, by Filat

goldseven:

A sorrowful meeting

Sorrowful was their meeting in Tasarinan; for Finrod was lost and Angrod too, and never more would…

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goldseven:

A sorrowful meeting

Sorrowful was their meeting in Tasarinan; for Finrod was lost and Angrod too, and never more would…

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stoneofthehapless:

Fingolfin Leads the Host Across the Helcaraxë; art by Ted Nasmith

Then Fingolfin seeing that Fëanor had left him to perish in Araman or return in shame to Valinor was filled with bitterness; but he desired now as never before to come by some way to Middle-earth, and meet Fëanor again. And he and his host wandered long in misery, but their valour and endurance grew with hardship; for they were a mighty people, the elder children undying of Elu Ilúvatar, but new-come from the Blessed Realm, and not yet weary with the weariness of Earth. The fire of their hearts was young, and led by Fingolfin and his sons, and by Finrod and Galadriel, they dared to pass into the bitterest North; and finding no other way they endured at last the terror of the Helcaraxë and the cruel hills of ice. Few of the deeds of the Noldor thereafter surpassed that desperate crossing in hardihood or woe. There Elenwë the wife of Turgon was lost, and many others perished also; and it was with a lessened host that Fingolfin set foot at last upon the Outer Lands. Small love for Fëanor or his sons had those that marched at last behind him, and blew their trumpets in Middle-earth at the first rising of the Moon.

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, “Of the Flight of the Noldor”

stoneofthehapless:

Fingolfin Leads the Host Across the Helcaraxë; art by Ted Nasmith

Then Fingolfin seeing that Fëanor had left him to perish in Araman or return in shame to Valinor was filled with bitterness; but he desired now as never before to come by some way to Middle-earth, and meet Fëanor again. And he and his host wandered long in misery, but their valour and endurance grew with hardship; for they were a mighty people, the elder children undying of Elu Ilúvatar, but new-come from the Blessed Realm, and not yet weary with the weariness of Earth. The fire of their hearts was young, and led by Fingolfin and his sons, and by Finrod and Galadriel, they dared to pass into the bitterest North; and finding no other way they endured at last the terror of the Helcaraxë and the cruel hills of ice. Few of the deeds of the Noldor thereafter surpassed that desperate crossing in hardihood or woe. There Elenwë the wife of Turgon was lost, and many others perished also; and it was with a lessened host that Fingolfin set foot at last upon the Outer Lands. Small love for Fëanor or his sons had those that marched at last behind him, and blew their trumpets in Middle-earth at the first rising of the Moon.

— J.R.R. Tolkien, The Silmarillion, “Of the Flight of the Noldor”

markedasinfernal:

'…and even as the Moon rose above the darkness in the west, Fingolfin let blow his silver trumpets and began his march into Middle-earth, and the shadows of his host went long and black before them.' - Of the Sun and Moon, The Silmarillion.
Moonrise, by Maciek Wygnanski

markedasinfernal:

'…and even as the Moon rose above the darkness in the west, Fingolfin let blow his silver trumpets and began his march into Middle-earth, and the shadows of his host went long and black before them.' - Of the Sun and Moon, The Silmarillion.

Moonrise, by Maciek Wygnanski

Grond was the great warhammer of Morgoth Bauglír, the first Dark Lord, which he wielded in the First Age. It was also referred to as the Hammer of the Underworld. He wielded it when he fought with Fingolfin, who challenged him to single combat after much of the Noldorin were defeated in the Dagor Bragollach.

During the Third Age, Sauron, Morgoth’s trusted servant and his successor as the Dark Lord, perhaps in homage to the Hammer of the Underworld, gave the name Grond to an enormous battering ram forged in Mordor to smash open the gates of Minas Tirith.